Now is the Age of Patient Anxiety

Name an illness; any illness at any stage. Whatever the reason your patient is seeing you--- from follow-up only to acute symptoms to a new problem ---- you can safely assume your patient is anxious about what you might have found or will say to them. Patients who are...

The Impact of Health IT on Patient Experience

  “Information Technology” (IT) has made remarkable advances for the hospital section of the health care delivery systems. Many hospital activities, such as scheduling of nurses, bed control, tests for patients and operating room time, billing payers, inventory...

Patient Relationships: Patients Have a Wonderful Stories to Tell

Patients have wonderful stories to tell; sharing stories about themselves, families or friends makes them feel better and often tells you something insightful about the person. Sometimes there’s a temptation to interrupt the storytelling of the patient, in an effort...

Health Literacy in the United States

Health care professionals need to educate their patients so that the patients are satisfied, and the physicians and other health professionals feel satisfied. Even today, health care professionals continue to assume that patients have understood what they were being...

The Art of Listening

Hear what the patient is saying, repeat what you heard, and then check with the patient. Maintain a positive tone and provide encouragement. Positivity is key in building trust and a working relationship with your patient. Most patients will listen better and follow your advice if they know that you’re on their side.

Turning Your Back On Patients

Just as much as we get annoyed with people hovering over their smartphones while trying to have a conversation with us, it’s the same for the patient who is trying to talk to a healthcare provider who is typing away on a computer. A patient’s ability to see you — and see you in a positive way — is important.

Do Your Patients Understand & Remember What You Just Said?

It’s beneficial for both you and the patient if you, as the healthcare provider, can develop a baseline for your patient’s health literacy and work with them on their level. Here are some things you can avoid: rushed visits, medical terms and jargon, their perception of “big words”, and making use of statistical concepts (such as probability and risk ) to explain “best choices.

Do Your Patients Understand & Remember What You Just Said?

It’s beneficial for both you and the patient if you, as the healthcare provider, can develop a baseline for your patient’s health literacy and work with them on their level. Here are some things you can avoid: rushed visits, medical terms and jargon, their perception of “big words”, and making use of statistical concepts (such as probability and risk ) to explain “best choices.

Have You Met Your Patient's Advocate?

All patients need advocates who have legal status to represent them in medical matters if they can’t represent themselves. Spouses have legal status without any paperwork, but all other advocates — friend or family — need signed legal papers. Encourage them to get Advanced Directives also.